Travel 101: Know the Perks and Pitfalls of Long-term Travel

You know what makes it hard to plan a long-term trip? The fact that you can’t plan it! When you’re thinking of taking a two-week holiday, everyone at work will be dropping by your cubicle to tell you where to go, which hotel to stay, and what to order at the bar.

If you’re evaluating a more serious travel plan however – possibly giving up a home and a job – there’s just no way of knowing where it’ll lead you. A lot of people find the thought terrifying. Some love the thought of being unshackled and free, but this is a serious decision that could impact the rest of your life.

Here’s our list of pros and cons to help you out:

The Pitfalls

Missing Family + Friends

You’ll be away from everyone you love for a long time. You’ll miss family birthdays, anniversaries, weddings, hanging out with friends and tons of important events.

You won’t always be able to reach out at the right time if you don’t have an internet connection. On those days that your family is driving you crazy (yes, we all have them!), this will sound like a good thing, but when your youngest sibling celebrates a birthday without you and you can’t call him or her, you’ll question the whole point of being away.

Solitude
Solitude © Vinoth Chandar

Being Alone

Being in new places will leave you feeling isolated and alone on some days, especially if you don’t speak the language. You could get to a beautiful campsite and sit under a dark blue sky speckled with stars only to feel tiny and impossibly far from home.

Packing Sucks

You probably won’t have a place to call home for longer than a few days at a time, especially if you’re backpacking or camping. Every day, you’ll have to pack up a tent, an entire kitchen, all your personal stuff, and cart it to the next location. It gets tiring after a while.

Creature Comforts

“Hmm, am I in a zingy apricot shampoo mood or a tropical coconutty shampoo mood?”

You don’t have the luxury of this anymore. No more bathroom shelf lined with ten shampoos to suit your mood, or a fridge stocked with all your regular brands. You won’t have that well-worn armchair, nor will you sleep in that bed which perfectly conforms to your body. Instead, you’ll have a host of new campsites, hostels, motels that change everyday and demand more adjustments than you expected.


Clean? Maybe. © Sean McGrath

Personal Hygiene Is Questionable

Some days there’s a spider occupying the bathroom. Some days, you forget to do your laundry and have to turn your underwear inside out, grin and bear it. Some days it’s just too damn tiring to take off all your clothes and wash your hair. Yes, you won’t always be perfectly clean and neat.

Losing Professional Connections + Opportunities

Your work network will suddenly seem lower on the priority list. They can’t help you find a motel for the night, can they? Then they don’t matter right now.

You might miss out on a job that you were perfect for. You might find that your rival at work has been promoted to that role you were eyeing. That’ll suck, and it’ll give you at least one introspective evening staring into the campfire, wondering if you chose right (if so, check out our reasons why travel is good for your resume).

The thing is, though, even as this list adds up, it’s really not that bad. Or let’s put it this way: it might be difficult but it’s worth everything because of …

2 Girls Riding Horseback at Morro Strand State Beach, California
Riding Horseback at Morro Strand State Beach, California © Mike Baird

The Perks

Seeing the World

Obviously, this is the biggest perk of all. You’ll see more of a country than even its locals do. As Dr.Seuss says, ”˜Oh, the places you’ll go….’ and it’s true. Huge waterfalls leading to ocean lagoons, burning sunsets over vast animal-dotted plains, forests turning from emerald green to the blazing yellow and orange of fall, winter landscapes gleaming with pristine snow — they’re all waiting for you. You’ll visit museums, art galleries, historic landmarks and more, and wander the streets of cities that most people only read about.

Stories to Tell

When you’re old & rocking in your porch chair, you’ll be able to start your stories with, “This one time when I was backpacking through Death Valley”¦”

When you’re old and rocking in that chair on the porch, you’ll be able to start your stories with, “This one time when I was backpacking through Death Valley”¦”. You’ll be the cool old guy or girl who did so much.

When you travel, stories seem to pile up and you’d never be able to build such an interesting repertoire if you don’t go out and see the world.

Pink Sunset Over Petra, Jordan
Exploring Petra at Sunset, Jordan © Salim Al-Harthy

The World Is Your Classroom

When you travel, you learn so much about yourself, about people, about the places you’re visiting and about humankind. It’s not always an easy lesson and sometimes you learn truths about yourself that you’d rather not admit. But you’ll come out knowing more than any self-help book or class could’ve taught you.

Make that plan, buy that ticket – get out there and see the world. You’ll only be richer for it.

You Become Fearless, Stronger + More Confident

Shy? Timid? Afraid of what’ll happen in a foreign country when you’re alone? Travel takes care of all that by forcing you to step outside of your comfort zone.

You’ll be more prepared to handle the unexpected when you’ve made ad hoc adjustments to your plans. You’ll be braver when you’ve camped in the middle of bear country. And you definitely won’t fear talking to strangers when you’ve navigated strange towns with strange languages, armed with nothing but a guide to key phrases and a confident smile. If you want to be leaner, meaner and stronger, travel is the only positive thing that can bring about this metamorphosis.

The Bottom Line

What is our verdict? Focus on the perks. You can always find ways to get around the pitfalls, but there’s hardly anything that can give you the benefits of long-term travel. So make that plan, buy that ticket, and get out there and see the world. You’ll only be richer for it.

6 Responses

  1. Dhawal Oza

    Awsome one dear …
    Loved it .

    “Make that plan, buy that ticket – get out there and see the world. You’ll only be richer for it.” Killer dear :/)
    Missing ull :-)

    Reply
  2. Dariece - Goats On The Road

    I completely agree with all of your points! Some days it may be harder to see the positives to full time travel, but then something amazing will happen and you’ll be reminded that “this is why you travel”

    For us, the perks far outweigh the pitfalls :)

    Thanks for a great read. All the best for 2014.

    Reply
  3. Jenny

    I can definitely relate to all of that. One more perk to add, partly in response to “Losing Professionals Connections,” is gaining connections. There are people that I’ve worked with and then there are people that I’ve sat in Bedouin tents with.

    Reply
  4. drue

    There is one con not on your list, involving taxes. Technically, you are legally required to file taxes when abroad, I have to wonder if there is any way around this? I do not plan I being stationary for longer than a year, and certainly not in my home country, but I kind of need them for my passport. I suppose I could jump borders, but it seems like so much more trouble than it’s worth. It really is a topic that no one gets in to. How do you handle this speed bump?

    Reply
  5. will dieterich

    Drue:

    From living overseas, taxes are the simple thing. You can download the forms, or you can purchase digital version of the tax software that you can download. Then you just file electronically and are done.
    If you don’t want to do that then hire a tax accountant back in the USA mail the info and supporting document. They fill it in get approval from you to file and they file the documents.

    Reply

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